Papa Stour Kirk and Interpretive centre

Papa Stour Kirk and Interpretive centre

How do I get to Papa Stour?    Loganair (part of the Flybe group) fly from Aberdeen, Belfast, Benbecula, Birmingham, Campbeltown, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Exeter, Glasgow, Guernsey, Inverness, Isle of Man, Jersey, Leeds/Bradford, Kirkwall, London (Gatwick), Manchester, Manston (Kent), Newquay, Norwich, Southampton and Stornoway to Sumburgh airport on the southern tip of mainland Shetland.  Or, you could travel by Northlink ferry from the ferry terminal in Aberdeen.  An inter-island passenger ferry leaves West Burrafirth, on the west coast of Shetland, to make the short crossing to Papa Stour.  There is also a flight from Tingwall airport to Papa Stour with Direct Flight.

 

How do I get around Papa Stour?   Visitors have little need of a car as there is not much road on Papa Stour!  Also, the ferry to Papa Stour is passenger only.  Therefore, the best way to get around Papa Stour is on foot. or by bike.

 

Papa Stour - Kirk and Interpretive Centre
Papa Stour - Kirk and Interpretive Centre
Papa Stour - Ferry Terminal
Papa Stour - Ferry Terminal
Papa Stour - Fore Wick
Papa Stour - Fore Wick

 

What’s worth visiting on Papa Stour?  Virda Field is the highest point on the island.  It’s worth making the effort to get there for the panoramic views.  Also, excavations have taken place at Da Biggings where the foundations of a  large, medieval Norse house have been uncovered.  There is an information board on the site that explains more about this.  Walking around the coast of Papa Stour affords amazing views of sea caves, sea stacks, Geo’s and natural arches.

 

Where can I stay on Papa Stour?  North House Guest House provides full board accommodation for up to five people.  Other accommodation on Papa Stour includes the Hurdiback Hostel or, if you prefer, you can pitch a tent next door to the Hostel at Robina’s.

 

Any other information on Papa Stour?  There are many shipwrecks around Papa Stour, the most famous of which is the Ben Doran, which ran aground in 1930.  As a result of this, a permanent lifeboat is now stationed at Aith, close by on the west coast of mainland Shetland.  The crews here have been honoured with 10 awards for gallantry – for rescues carried out in their all-weather lifeboat.

 

Other islands in Shetland: See the pages for Mainland Shetland, Bressay, Burra Isles, Fair Isle, Fetlar, Foula, Mousa, Noss, Out Skerries, Unst, Whalsay and Yell.